Spring, 2013

University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer CenterCancer News
Herceptin Fab antibody

U-M study challenges notion of using Herceptin only for HER2-positive breast cancer

New research from the U-M Comprehensive Cancer Center finds that the protein HER2 plays a role even in breast cancers that would traditionally be categorized as HER2-negative -- and that the drug Herceptin, which targets HER2, may have an even greater role for treating breast cancer and preventing its spread. more

From Patient to Philanthropist

Although just out of high school, Matt Vogel left a lasting legacy for others facing rare skull base tumors.

In the years since Matthew Vogel died, part of him has continued on at the University of Michigan. more

Matthew Vogel

More News

image of patient sitting in a waiting room

Gene sequencing program helps identify cancer mutations

By looking at the entire DNA from just one patient's tumor, researchers have found a genetic anomaly that provides an important clue to improving how this cancer is diagnosed and treated. more

image of light bulb

New technique sheds light on RNA

When researchers sequence the RNA of cancer cells, they can compare it to normal cells and see where there is more RNA. That can help lead them to the gene or protein that might be triggering the cancer. more

image of the letters U and M with cells on them

Capturing circulating cancer cells could provide insights into how disease spreads

Circulating tumor cells are believed to contribute to cancer metastasis, the grim process of the disease spreading from its original site to distant tissues. Blood tests that count these cells can help doctors predict how long a patient with widespread cancer will live. more

Elena Stoffel, MD
Michigan Athletics is planning an exciting event June 6-7 that will create a memorable Wolverine football experience that will benefit cancer research. Learn more

Global Youth Service: Kick Cancer
On April 25th students, faculty, and friends of Northview Crossroads Middle School in Grand Rapids, will host a walkathon to support the UMCCC. Learn more

iPads Help Cancer Patients Wile Away the Hours
ComfortApp, a student-run organization, has been raising funds to allow the UMCCC to loan iPads to cancer patients undergoing treatment. The devices help to make the time pass more enjoyably, and help patients stay connected to family and friends. Learn more

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Football fundraiser

U-M Football Event Supports Cancer Research

The University of Michigan Health System, in partnership with Michigan Athletics, is gearing up for an event that combines Michigan football and U-M's cancer research.

The Michigan Men's Football Experience runs June 6-7 and is still registering participants.

Circulating cancer cells

Capturing circulating cancer cells could provide insights into how disease spreads

A glass plate with a nanoscale roughness could be a simple way for scientists to capture and study the circulating tumor cells that carry cancer around the body through the bloodstream.

Engineering and medical researchers at the University of Michigan have devised such a set-up, which they say takes advantage of cancer cells' stronger drive to settle and bind compared with normal blood cells.

Gene sequencing and cancer

Gene sequencing program helps identify cancer mutations

MI-ONCOSEQ effort gives researchers new leads to improve treatments

It started with a 44-year-old woman with solitary fibrous tumor, a rare cancer seen in only a few hundred people each year.

By looking at the entire DNA from this one patient's tumor, researchers have found a genetic anomaly that provides an important clue to improving how this cancer is diagnosed and treated.

Patient to philanthropist

Although just out of high school, Matt Vogel left a lasting legacy for others facing rare skull base tumors

In the years since Matthew Vogel died, part of him has continued on at the University of Michigan.

A native of Kansas who was studying at St. Olaf College in Minnesota, Matt lost his life to sinonasal undifferentiated cancer, or SNUC, in 1997. But his final gift continues to provide hope for others like him, others who will get the difficult news that they have a rare and little-understood skull base tumor with a poor prognosis.

Herceptin and breast cancer

U-M study challenges notion of using Herceptin only for HER2-positive breast cancer

Breast cancer stem cells express HER2, even in 'negative' tumors, study finds

New research from the University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center finds that the protein HER2 plays a role even in breast cancers that would traditionally be categorized as HER2-negative -- and that the drug Herceptin, which targets HER2, may have an even greater role for treating breast cancer and preventing its spread.

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