Thrive Archive

Winter, 2013

Cover Story

Health of the Whole

Many of the traditional symptoms of depression overlap with the symptoms of cancer, such as fatigue, weight changes, sleep problems, lack of concentration, lack of energy and guilt. Each patient must be evaluated properly, in the context of the cancer itself, as part of fully integrated care that links physical treatment and the psychological needs of the individual.

Winter, 2012

Cover Story

The Next Generation

It's a frustrating fact: Preserving fertility for women who face cancer treatments that damage their reproductive organs is much more complicated than it is for men. But the options are slowly expanding for women who would like to build families after treatment.

Fall, 2012

Cover Story

Up and Down the Family Tree

Paula Wishart is a cancer dodger. Thanks to the University of Michigan Cancer Genetics Clinic, she was diagnosed with Lynch Syndrome, a hereditary condition that greatly increases the chances of developing colon and other cancers earlier in life than what’s considered typical.

Summer, 2012

Cover Story

Care for the Caregiver

When Carol Rugg was diagnosed with breast cancer in 1997, her fiancé Richard Montmorency thought they'd gotten the "in sickness" part of their marriage out of the way early. Rugg fought the disease with Montmorency as her caregiver, an experience they did not expect to repeat as the years passed with no recurrence.

Spring, 2012

Cover Story

There's No Place Like Home

Home-based treatments are a welcome option

Winter, 2011

Cover Story

Nature's Medicine

Spending time in nature may improve memory and concentration among cancer patients

Fall, 2011

Cover Story

The Engaged Patient

The culture of medicine has changed: Gone are the days when doctors dispensed treatment with a paternalistic air. As medicine has advanced, patients have more choices about how they can approach their care. Combined with the vast amount of health information available on the Internet, patients are educating themselves and partnering with their physicians to make informed medical decisions.

Summer, 2011

Cover Story

Bone Deep

Bone health may be of particular concern for cancer survivors. People with breast or prostate cancer who undergo treatments that block specific hormones may be at higher risk of thinning bones. Also, certain chemotherapy drugs used to treat these or other cancers may induce ovarian failure in younger women, causing bones to thin as a result of early menopause and estrogen deprivation. In addition, steroids may also accelerate bone loss in both men and women.

Spring, 2011

Cover Story

Steps of Hope

Cancer awareness walks raise more than money

Winter, 2010

Cover Story

Focusing on the Caregiver

U-M research offers insight into helping caregivers cope