News Archive

Date: 11/30/2015
Can any cancer cell form another tumor, or is it only select cancer stem cells that give rise to new cancer cells? The answer, a new study finds, is both.
Date: 11/20/2015
Combinations of a significant number of non-toxic chemicals, many of which can be found in plants and foods, may offer a chance to stop untreatable cancers and prevent disease relapse.
Date: 11/12/2015
Kura Oncology Inc., a clinical stage biopharmaceutical company that develops therapies for cancer patients, is now trading on the NASDAQ after an initial public offering.
Date: 11/10/2015
Patients being treated for breast cancer at the University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center now have a new way to help manage the overload of information and reminders that comes with cancer diagnosis, surgery, chemotherapy or radiation treatment.
Date: 11/03/2015
When cancer cells compete with immune cells for glucose, the cancer wins. As a result, the immune T cells are not healthy and don’t have the weapons to kill the cancer.
Date: 10/27/2015
A new study suggests a potential new way to block one of the most common cancer-causing genes, without causing severe side effects.
Date: 10/26/2015
A new study from the University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center reveals molecular changes within a tumor that are preventing immunotherapy drugs from killing off the cancer. It explains why not all patients respond to immunotherapy treatments.
Date: 10/23/2015
A new study shows that a web-based app is effective at improving patient's knowledge about lung cancer and screening. The app offers personalized recommendations to help people determine if they are right for lung cancer screening.
Date: 09/09/2015
A small, implantable device that researchers are calling a cancer “super-attractor” could eventually give doctors an early warning of relapse in breast cancer patients and even slow the disease’s spread to other organs in the body.
Date: 09/01/2015
For children with rare, aggressive and advanced cancer, precision medicine may help doctors determine their best treatment options, a new study finds. Using information from a patient’s entire genome helped suggest personalized treatment options for nearly half of children with cancer, and led to specific treatment changes in a quarter of these patients.