News Archive

Date: 06/22/2015
Cancerous tumors cast off tiny telltale genetic molecules known as microRNAs and a team of University of Michigan researchers has come up with an efficient way to detect them in blood.
Date: 06/19/2015
President Barack Obama announced his selection of Max S. Wicha, M.D., as one of five new appointees to the National Cancer Advisory Board.
Date: 06/10/2015
A new study suggests that fusion of one normal cell with another — as observed in inflammation, infection, and injury from carcinogens — triggers a “genomic catastrophe” that converts normal cells to cancer cells and enables tumors to form.
Date: 06/04/2015
Cancer Center researchers presented on care coordination and quality of care in colorectal cancer, imaging to predict sarcoma treatment, using serial biopsies to find aggressive prostate cancer, and side effects of oral chemotherapy at the American Society of Clinical Oncology annual meeting.
Date: 06/02/2015
A survey of women with breast cancer found that nearly half considered having a double mastectomy. But of those who considered it, only 37 percent knew that the more aggressive procedure does not improve survival for women with breast cancer.
Date: 05/21/2015
In a major advance in precision medicine, an international collaboration of researchers found 90 percent of castration resistant metastatic prostate cancers harbored some kind of genetic anomaly that could drive treatment choices.
Date: 05/19/2015
Why do some cancer cells break away from a tumor and travel to distant parts of the body? A team of oncologists and engineers from the University of Michigan teamed up to help understand this crucial question.
Date: 05/18/2015
A new urine-based test improved prostate cancer detection – including detecting more aggressive forms of prostate cancer – compared to traditional models based on prostate serum antigen, or PSA, levels, a new study finds.
Date: 05/12/2015
Researchers have developed and tested a new tool that searches for the most common genetic anomalies seen in cancer. The assay demonstrates the ability to make gene sequencing easier over a large volume of samples. In the future, this may mean that patients would not always need to undergo a fresh biopsy in order to identify a potential treatment strategy, as is currently necessary with more comprehensive sequencing approaches.
Date: 05/11/2015
More patients age 9-26 started and completed cervical cancer vaccine series due to electronic health record “prompts” at doctor appointments.

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