Pancreatic Cancer

Transforming the future of Pancreatic Cancer Care

At the University of Michigan Pancreatic Cancer Center, we believe that our unique interdisciplinary approach sets us on a 5-10-year path toward mastering early detection, arresting metastasis and extending the quantity and quality of life for pancreatic cancer patients.

Diane Simeone, MD and Sunitha Nagrath, Ph.D.
Diane Simeone, M.D., Director, U-M Pancreatic Cancer Center (left) and Sunitha Nagrath, Ph.D.

We are the Leaders and Best

The U-M Pancreatic Cancer Center defines the clinical paradigm of care; leads the nation in the approach to tumors; and sets the guidelines and standards now being used around the world.

  • World-class Techniques: We are pioneering a simple blood test that can be used to perform an entire clinical trial in three weeks. This enables the detection of pancreatic cancer at its earliest stages, before development of invasive cancer, and serves as an efficient sample in identifying effective drug therapy.
    • Early detection: Through genetic testing, we can now determine risk -- within in a 40-50 percent success rate -- in patients with a family history of pancreatic cancer who have not yet developed the disease. Looking ahead, we are committed to increasing the early detection of risk to 100 percent accuracy.
    • Treatment: We are personalizing drug therapies to patients by cultivating and sequencing their circulating tumor cells in the lab, cataloguing the full host of gene mutations (out of 63 possible) and treating those tumor samples with various drugs. This enables us to identify the most effective drug therapy prior to prescription.
  • Unique Collaborative Approach: We have the largest number of dedicated, interdisciplinary pancreatic cancer researchers in the country, including internationally-recognized leadership.
  • Revolutionary History: We were the first to identify the pancreatic stem cells responsible for disease spread, and to measure circulating pancreatic cells. We are innovators in creating next generation genetically-engineered models of pancreatic cancer, facilitating comprehensive study of the disease.

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