Prostate Cancer Awareness

Other than skin cancer, prostate cancer is the most common cancer in American men

Several types of cells are found in the prostate, but almost all prostate cancers develop from the gland cells. Gland cells make the prostate fluid that is added to the semen. The medical term for a cancer that starts in gland cells is adenocarcinoma.

Other types of cancer can also start in the prostate gland, including sarcomas, small cell carcinomas, and transitional cell carcinomas. But these types of prostate cancer are so rare that if you have prostate cancer it is almost certain to be an adenocarcinoma.

Other than skin cancer, prostate cancer is the most common cancer in American men. The latest American Cancer Society estimates for prostate cancer in the United States are for 2012:

  • About 241,740 new cases of prostate cancer will be diagnosed
  • About 28,170 men will die of prostate cancer

About 1 man in 6 will be diagnosed with prostate cancer during his lifetime.

Source - American Cancer Society: What is Prostate Cancer?

Risk Factors

A risk factor is anything that affects your chance of getting a disease such as cancer. Different cancers have different risk factors. Some risk factors, like smoking, can be changed. Others, like a person's age or family history, can't be changed.

But risk factors don't tell us everything. Many people with one or more risk factors never get cancer, while others who get cancer may have had few or no known risk factors.

Studies have found the following risk factors for prostate cancer:

  • Age:
    Prostate cancer is very rare in men younger than 40, but the chance of having prostate cancer rises rapidly after age 50. Almost 2 out of 3 prostate cancers are found in men over the age of 65.
  • Race/ethnicity:
    Prostate cancer occurs more often in African-American men than in men of other races. African-American men are also more likely to be diagnosed at an advanced stage, and are more than twice as likely to die of prostate cancer as white men. Prostate cancer occurs less often in Asian-American and Hispanic/Latino men than in non-Hispanic whites. The reasons for these racial and ethnic differences are not clear.
  • Nationality:
    Prostate cancer is most common in North America, northwestern Europe, Australia, and on Caribbean islands. It is less common in Asia, Africa, Central America, and South America. The reasons for this are not clear.
  • Family history:
    Prostate cancer seems to run in some families, which suggests that in some cases there may be an inherited or genetic factor. Having a father or brother with prostate cancer more than doubles a man's risk of developing this disease. (The risk is higher for men who have a brother with the disease than for those with an affected father.) The risk is much higher for men with several affected relatives, particularly if their relatives were young at the time the cancer was found.
  • Genes:
    Scientists have found several inherited gene changes that seem to raise prostate cancer risk, but they probably account for only a small number of cases overall. Genetic testing for most of these gene changes is not yet available.
  • Diet:
    The exact role of diet in prostate cancer is not clear, but several factors have been studied.

    Men who eat a lot of red meat or high-fat dairy products appear to have a slightly higher chance of getting prostate cancer. These men also tend to eat fewer fruits and vegetables. Doctors are not sure which of these factors is responsible for raising the risk.
  • Obesity:
    Most studies have not found that being obese (very overweight) is linked with a higher risk of getting prostate cancer overall.

Source American Cancer Society: What are the risk factors for prostate cancer?.

Symptoms

Early prostate cancer usually causes no symptoms. Some advanced prostate cancers can slow or weaken your urinary stream or make you need to urinate more often, especially at night. But non-cancerous diseases of the prostate, such as benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) cause these symptoms more often.

If prostate cancer is advanced you may experience the following symptoms:

  • Blood in urine(hematuria)
  • Trouble getting an erection(impotence)
  • Pain in the hips, back, chest
  • Weakness or numbness in legs or feet
  • Loss of bladder control

Source American Cancer Society: How is prostate cancer diagnosed?

Learn more about this test by reading U-M offers new early detection test for prostate cancer

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