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Treatment Choices

One-Third of Breast Cancer Patients Consult PCPs About Treatment Options

As more people survive cancer, primary care physicians and oncologists must work together to manage patient care. That’s because once cancer treatment ends, patients eventually transition back to their primary care physician.

Move, Breathe, Eat, Relax

When Martha Driskel learned she had esophageal cancer and needed a surgical procedure called an esophagectomy, she wanted to heal as quickly as possible. Thanks to the new Michigan Surgical and Health Optimization Program, her recovery went better than expected.

The PSA: Questions and Answers

Todd Morgan, M.D. of the U-M Multidisciplinary Urologic Oncology Clinic answers questions about prostate cancer biomarkers and explains how they help in prostate cancer treatment.

When You're Diagnosed with Skin Cancer

The first step in treating skin cancer is proper diagnosis. This requires your doctor to remove a small tissue sample (a biopsy) from the suspected site. When done at the University of Michigan, a specially trained dermatopathologist examines the biopsy to determine if cancer is present and if so what type.

Hope and Heirlooms

Christine Knight's family has always joked she was born with a needle in her hand. Like many busy wives and mothers, her hobby came second to her life. That changed when she was diagnosed with melanoma.

Quality of Care and Life

Mike Sanders wanted you to know: participating in a clinical trial does not rule your life. Nor does it mean your doctors only care about whether the medication is working or not.

One Doctor, Five Minutes, New Life

Communication with the patient and family is at the heart of the relationship between the patient, her family or friends, and the doctor. Nothing supplants the bond that forms when the patient knows her doctor is watching out for her health and for her life. As a doctor, you must convey that commitment with words and actions forever.

Precise Treatment, Precise Care

Patients who receive radiation therapy understand that the process often comes with anxiety. In order to reduce some of this anxiety, the Department of Radiation Oncology formed a Patient and Family Centered Care (PFCC) committee. The goal of the group is to offer patients and families the opportunity to reflect on their treatment and recommend potential ways to improve the experience for others.

Diagnosis, Pause, Decision

It's only natural when you hear the word cancer to want to spring into action to get rid of it. It's also natural to think about people you know who've had cancer and the decisions they made to treat it. You're afraid. You have families and friends to think about. You need to decide on your treatment . . . but not so fast.

Understanding a Tumor Board

Cancer Center experts meet to discuss patient cases and come up with innovative treatment options that could save lives.

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